Kawartha Lakes Community
Bobcaygeon

One of the fatest growing communities in Ontario, it's no surprise more and more people are deciding not only to play, but live in Bobcaygeon.

Still a premier locale for a summer break in an ideal setting, Bobcaygeon is located on three islands between two beautiful lakes linked by a canal, which runs through the heart of the village, right beside its popular downtown.

Infact, the first lock on the Trent-Severn Waterway, Lock 32, was built here, where visitors also watch the swing bridges alternately allow boats and vehicle traffic to pass through.

Few places are as alive and active as Bobcaygeon, which offers something for everyone, whether they are looking to slow life down or a place to raise a family.

All the amenities you need are just a short drive away.

While there are a number of excellent retirement facilities located in town, Bobcaygeon, like most communities in the Kawartha Lakes, also boasts grand century homes as well as modern models.

Activities abound for juniors and seniors alike, from sports like tennis, golf and curling to service clubs and art galleries.

The stunning surroundings, including the waters of Pigeon and Sturgeon lakes, aren't the only reason people come from all over Ontario to visit Bobcaygeon.

The tourism boom has made the village an ideal place for accomodation and service businesses to set up shop and cater to the thousands who pass through the town.

Bobcaygeon isn't all about modern amenities, either. Many locals can trace their family histories back many generations, which adds to the historical atmosphere of the area.

Kawartha's Settler's Village offers a step back in time to showcase the villages's history and how its founders built the community. Restored buildings and ongoing exhibits, such as a restored scale model of the railroad that once crossed Bobcaygeon, inform and entertain visitors.

Those with a taste for music can also enjoy the Open Step Dance and Fiddle Contest that showcases the best oldtime players, while launching the stars of tomorrow.

Being in the heart of the Kawartha's, it's no surprise that sport fishing also plays a key role in the area's economy.

An annual highlight in the Canada/U.S. Walleye Fishing Tournament, which draws some of the best anglers on the continent every May in the hope of landing the big one.

Kawartha Dairy also has its headquarters on Prince Street in Bobcaygeon. The 100 per cent Canadian-owned company, which uses only real cream, has been making delicious premium ice cream and milk products since 1937.

Retail is a very large draw to the Bobcaygeon area, with many quaint shops on Bolton Street and surrounding areas of the downtown.

Bigley Shoes & Clothing, which has expanded its operations, has been a downtown mainstay for many years.

The Buckeye family has also started spinoff retail operations namely Buckeye Lifestyles and Buckeye Outdoors Adventure Apparel.

The Buckeye family also includes Buckeye Source for Sports, which offers the latest in water gear, Buckeye Centre (a hotel near the lift lock), and Buckeye Marine, the first of the Buckeye businesses, which opened back in 1949.

Bobcaygeon also offers dining for all tastes. You can choose form Danish, Italian or Lebanese food, home style, fish and chips, or just quick takeout. Fine Dining is also available at Eganridge Inn, Country Club & Spa (just west of town) and at the Waters Edge Restaurant in the heart of the village.

A new addition to the arts scene in the Bobcaygeon area is the Lakeview Arts Barn, located on Pigeon Lake Road just to the south.

The LAB opened in June 2006 by playright Norm Foster. It now acts as a platform for all arts disciplines from visual to performing, with year-round entertainment.

It also features artist showcases, festivals, workshops and of course, great theatre via company-in-residence Globus Theatre Inc.

The local branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, like others across the City of Kawartha Lakes, is also a very integral component of the Bobcaygeon community.

Courtesy of the Lindsay Post
www.thepost.ca